Students harvest another gift from nature

Kinuso School Grade 5-6 students took part in land-based learning April 15. They learned how to harvest birch sap from Indigenous knowledge keepers and Elders. Photos courtesy of the school. According to Wikipedia, “birch sap has been used since the dawn of time for its innumerable virtues. It is a real concentrate of well-being. This raw water is known to eliminate toxins and to ensure the proper functioning of the body. Nevertheless, birch sap requires a specific harvesting process to preserve its purity and properties.”

Kinuso School student Aubrina Twin drills into a birch tree to collect birch sap. Kinuso School Grade 5-6 students took part in land-based learning April 15. They learned how to harvest birch sap from Indigenous knowledge keepers and Elders.
Kinuso School students walk past some birch sap containers on trees as part of their land-based learning on April 15.
Kinuso School student Ryder Churchill holds the bucket lid which will go onto a spigot into the tree with a hook which allows the birch sap to leak out into a bucket to be collected. In the background, Swan River First Nation cultural coordinator Richard Woodman, holds the bucket and helps with the teaching.

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