Court Docket – Court hears woman only 9 days short of completing peace bond

H.P. court docket
April 11, 2022
Judge G.W. Paul

A young woman who drove a vehicle in Faust while prohibited from driving will have plenty of time to think about her actions.
Iesha Don Jean Courtorielle, 24, was handed a conditional sentence order [CSO] of 60 days after pleading guilty in High Prairie provincial court April 11 to operating a vehicle while prohibited.
Court heard that Courtorielle was driving a vehicle when she was prohibited from driving, Crown prosecutor Terrance Hudson said. She was driving in Faust when she crashed into a vehicle parked at a residence and ran away.
Judge G.W. Paul supported a joint submission for sentence from the Crown and her lawyer, Harry Jong.
“When you drive a vehicle while prohibited, it’s a serious matter,” Judge Paul said during sentencing.
The incident began, Jong said, when Courtorielle wanted something to do.
“She got bored and went for a drive,” Jong said.
Courtorielle was also fined $200, plus a victim fine surcharge of $60, after pleading guilty to assault. The charge arose during the same incident when she assaulted a male at the scene of the crash.
“She grabbed him by his hoodie and tried to force him into her car,” Hudson said.
The assault was on the “low end,” Judge Paul deemed.
Courtorielle is required to serve the first 30 days of her order at an approved residence 24 hours a day. During the final 30 days, she will have more freedom and be on a curfew from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
There were a third legal matter Courtorielle pleaded guilty to: a second charge of driving while prohibited. She was handed a second conditional sentence order of 42 days consecutive to the other count.
The Crown told court police observed Court- orielle driving but she failed to stop at a stop sign.
Under terms of the order, she is required to serve the first 21 days at an approved residence 24 hours a day. During the final 30 days, she will have more freedom and be a curfew from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
Courtorielle will serve her first 60-day CSO followed by the second CSO for 42 days. After both are completed, she will be prohibited from driving a further two years, one year for each CSO.


Rebecca Missy Pat- enaude, 23, of Edmonton, was fined $200, plus a $60 victim fine surcharge, after pleading guilty to obstructing a peace officer.
Patenaude did not co-operate when police approached her about a matter, Crown prosecutor Sheen Kachroo told court.
“She gave a false name and date of birth,” the Crown said.
Judge G.W. Paul ordered her to pay the fine by July 18.
Patenaude was also fined $100, $150 and $200 each after pleading guilty to three counts of failing to appear in court. All three were docket days.
Judge Paul gave her no time to pay but gave her credit for five days already served in custody on the matter. He also encouraged the mother of three young children to live a responsible life without crime and alcohol.
“They need a clean and sober mother,” Judge Paul said.
“It’s on your shoulders; fix it up,” he added.


Amanda Nygaard was fined $300, plus a victim fine surcharge of $90, after pleading guilty to failing to appear in court.
She missed a trial date, Crown prosecutor Sheen Kachroo submitted.
Judge G.W. Paul asked Nygaard whey she did not attend her trial.
“I had COVID,” she replied.
Judge Paul said it was a legitimate reason and didn’t sentence her to 30 days in jail, which is the standard penalty.
Judge Paul ordered her to pay the fine by July 18 and reminded Nygaard and other people to phone the courthouse when they cannot appear for trial or docket days.


Cesillia Noskiye was fined $200, plus a $60 victim fine surcharge, after pleading guilty to breach of a peace bond.
Court heard she was seen with a person named in a no-contact order in a peace bond, Crown prosecutor Sheen Kachroo said.
Noskiye almost completed the one-year peace bond, the Crown added.
“Nine days from finishing the peace bond and you breach it,” he noted.
Judge Paul ordered Noskiye to pay the fine by July 18.


Edward Blair Calliou was fined $50 after pleading guilty to theft under $5,000.
Lakeshore Regional Police Service responded to a call from a female who was prepared to buy an ATV from a male for $1,500 in a deal that fell through on Aug. 1, 2019, Crown prosecutor Ter- rance Hudson said.
The victim had $1,500 in hand to buy the ATV for her brother, who took the ATV for a test drive. He then called his sister and said the ATV was broken and advised her to not purchase it, the Crown submitted.
“The accused then grabbed the $1,500 off the table and walked away,” Hudson said.
Judge G.W. Paul gave him a restitution order to pay the woman $1,500.

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